Soong-Chan Rah: The Next Evangelicalism, Session Three

This is the third part of Soong-Chan Rah’s The Next Evangelicalism seminar track from Cornerstone 2009.

 

Demographic changes will impact evangelicalism’s future – which has already begun. Will the transition to a vibrant, multi-ethnic Evangelical world be smoothed or slowed by existing institutions and congregations? This seminar surveys the new reality, its implications, and how Evangelicals can follow the best of their tradition on the right side of history and the Gospel.

Andrew Marin: Love is an Orientation, Session Two

Part two of Andrew Marin’s Seminar Track

 

“Love is not just a word. It is a measurable expression of one’s unconditional behaviors toward one another.” After his three best friends came out to him, Andrew Marin was moved to relocate to a gay community in Chicago to try to understand this culture and what it would mean to truly incarnate Christ within it. His experiences and insights from a variety of creative bridge-building efforts among GLBT people have challenged people on all sides of the issue with a reconsideration of what it means to represent and live the Gospel among our GLBT neighbors.

Richard Twiss: Jesus, A Tribal Man Becomes The Beauty Way, Session Two

This is the second part of Richard Twiss’s first seminar track from Cornerstone 2009.

Please Note: Cornerstone Festival was very pleased to have Richard Twiss share this excellent seminar track at Cornerstone 2009. We hope you enjoy it as much as we do. However,
it does contain some occasional explicit language.

 

Creator came to earth as a human being from the Tribe of Judah to bring all of creation back into harmony with the Beauty Way; Jesus came as a black-eyed, black-haired, dark-skinned indigenous boy. As this seminar will show, First Nations Christ-followers are uniquely situated to enrich understanding of the Gospel and discussion about non-western paradigms of church life.

Soong-Chan Rah: The Next Evangelicalism, Session Two

This is the second part of Soong-Chan Rah’s The Next Evangelicalism seminar track from Cornerstone 2009.

 

Demographic changes will impact evangelicalism’s future – which has already begun. Will the transition to a vibrant, multi-ethnic Evangelical world be smoothed or slowed by existing institutions and congregations? This seminar surveys the new reality, its implications, and how Evangelicals can follow the best of their tradition on the right side of history and the Gospel.

Andrew Marin: Love is an Orientation, Session One

Part one of Andrew Marin’s Seminar Track

 

“Love is not just a word. It is a measurable expression of one’s unconditional behaviors toward one another.” After his three best friends came out to him, Andrew Marin was moved to relocate to a gay community in Chicago to try to understand this culture and what it would mean to truly incarnate Christ within it. His experiences and insights from a variety of creative bridge-building efforts among GLBT people have challenged people on all sides of the issue with a reconsideration of what it means to represent and live the Gospel among our GLBT neighbors.

Richard Twiss: Jesus, A Tribal Man Becomes The Beauty Way, Session One

This is the first part of Richard Twiss’s first seminar track from Cornerstone 2009.

Please Note: Cornerstone Festival was very pleased to have Richard Twiss share this excellent seminar track at Cornerstone 2009. We hope you enjoy it as much as we do. However,
it does contain some occasional explicit language.

 

Creator came to earth as a human being from the Tribe of Judah to bring all of creation back into harmony with the Beauty Way; Jesus came as a black-eyed, black-haired, dark-skinned indigenous boy. As this seminar will show, First Nations Christ-followers are uniquely situated to enrich understanding of the Gospel and discussion about non-western paradigms of church life.

Soong-Chan Rah: The Next Evangelicalism, Session One

This is the first part of Soong-Chan Rah’s The Next Evangelicalism seminar track from Cornerstone 2009.

 

Demographic changes will impact evangelicalism’s future – which has already begun. Will the transition to a vibrant, multi-ethnic Evangelical world be smoothed or slowed by existing institutions and congregations? This seminar surveys the new reality, its implications, and how Evangelicals can follow the best of their tradition on the right side of history and the Gospel.

Rain all day, I’ll stay with you*

Moisture is definitely encompassing the Cornerstone grounds today. It seems that some campers have packed up, but those who remain are in for an unforgettable day. For some, the unforgettable nature will come from the switch of Main Stage acts to Encore I and Gallery Stages (as mentioned by others on the blog already). For others, the unforgettable aspects may come as a result of a new Saturday feature: a general session with worship & speakers in the Gallery.

This afternoon, in addition to being a refuge from the rain & mud, the Gallery is home to a general session with worship led by Bifrost Arts, a keynote address from Phyllis Tickle, and a round table response/discussion. Those attending will have opportunities to participate in worship (which, as the speakers reminded “is not a spectacle”), and be challenged with big ideas about the future of evangelicalism and more. It’s an opportunity to take the seminar conversations to the larger festival, and hopefully also a good way for the attendees to reconnect with God.

Organizers welcomed feedback about this Saturday general session to info@cornerstonefestival.com

*For the old-time music geeks out there, yes, the title of this post is inspired by Fleming & John. We listened to that on the drive in today.

The other side of Cornerstone

For my Friday report, I’m going to leave the band comments to the guys (we wound up seeing a lot of the same shows yesterday and they’re better able to describe them!). I’d like, instead, to focus on the other side of Cornerstone. While we talk mostly about music here, there’s a lot else that the festival has to offer. I took in several things on the other side yesterday.

Seminars:

As the emcee at the Stavesacre show said on Thursday, “If you’ve been coming to Cornerstone for more than 4 years and haven’t seen a seminar, you’re missing out.” This year’s seminar lineup was first-rate, featuring authors of popular books and thought-provoking topics.

Tony Jones & Phyllis Tickle brought seminars about the Emerging Church (or whatever you want to call that these days). Tickle also offered a short seminar on Friday about fixed-hour prayer, where she outlined the 7 practices or disciples brought into Christianity from Judaism: tithing, fasting, sacred meal (3 practices to disciple the physical), fixed hour prayer, sabbath, liturgical year, and pilgrimage (4 practices to discipline time).

Also on Friday, Andrew Marin continued his Love is An Orientation series. I didn’t hang around for it (went to another seminar instead) but he was definitely drawing large crowds for this talk, presumably related to the book by the same name.

The Music Professionals Series provided an accessible way for industry folks and up-and-coming bands to learn more about radio. That tent was packed with people asking questions of how to get their songs to break thru into radio.

The seminars are done for 2009 (other than the general session this afternoon), but there’s no doubt next year will offer another round of inspiring & challenging talks.

Art:

Burning Brush, the visual arts wing of the fest, presented the Parables of Jesus as the theme for their 2009 pilgrimage art installation. The pilgrimage, which runs from the Merch Tent to the Footbridge, features maybe 20 different art pieces of all kinds of media. A gorgeous batik and large mosaic of flowers anchor one end of the pilgrimage (the mosac shows great ingenuity by the artist, since it uses recycled bottle caps – from soda bottles, hershey’s syrup bottles, and more).

Breakaway:

Breakaway is held each morning in the Gallery, with worship & speakers relevant to high school students & those who work with them. I chaperoned a youth group several years ago, and though I don’t do so anymore, I still remember what a powerful experience Cornerstone can be for students. Breakaway is an excellent thing to include alongside seeing your favorite bands and hanging out with friends.

And many more…

Cornerstone is so diverse; it’s impossible to experience all of it. Try as I might, I never quite get around to seeing films at Flickerings (though maybe tonight for The Wizard of Oz or Mr. Smith Goes to Washington – both old favorites of mine). I don’t have kids, so I don’t make use of Creation Station – though every time I walk by, I can’ t help but smile. Then there’s the volleyball torunament, skateboard ramp, soccer fields, prom at the Asylum, impromptu rounds of buck-buck on the main stage hill, swimming in the lake, etc. Way too much to possibly take in!