Day 3 Wrap Up

So much good stuff was packed into this evening that I was all over the place.  I saw a ton of shows and I only hope I can remember half of what I saw and heard.

I started the afternoon off seeing Terry Taylor at the Gallery Stage.  The front man of so many famous bands, Daniel Amos, Swirling Eddies, Lost Dogs, etc. brought some of his friends, such as Mike Roe and Steve Hindalong on the stage and also his own son to play bass guitar.  The group reinterpreted many old classic songs to the delight of the crowd, many who have been fans for decades.

I hadn’t gotten a chance to get down to Main Stage at all this week, so I knew if I didn’t go tonight I wouldn’t get to.   I’ve gotten spoiled by having all my shows a short trek away.  So, I made the long walk down the hill and around the lake.  Just as I reached the lake I heard mewithoutyou finishing up “In A Sweater Poorly Knit” and crested the top of the hill above the stage to see a massive crowd at the show. The band was obviously a crowd favorite for many this year.  Following them was Shiny Toy Guns which brought a unique mix of dance and rock music to Main Stage.  After a couple songs, though, the rain began to fall and I, having expensive gadgetry and stuff to cover them back up the hill decided I should probably head back.

Fortunately, this gave me enough time to get back for Lost Dogs at the Gallery Stage.  Mike Roe, Terry Taylor, Steve Hindalong, and Derri Daugherty took a trip on Route 66 last summer, documenting the journey on video.  The show featured some nice rope twirling that Steve learned on the trip.  I had leave after a couple of songs, though, because there was one show at Cornerstone that I couldn’t miss.  When the best man in your wedding plays a show at Cornerstone, that trumps everything else.  Dave Richards was pumping out beats at the After Hours dance club.  I’ve said before that you can only go to Cornerstone so many times before you are driven to create also while you are there, whether it be playing music, painting, photography, or writing.   Indeed, there we were, Dave behind the turntables and me photographing him.

The rain started to fall a little harder, but it didn’t slow things down.  Cool Hand Luke played what many believe to be their last show at Cornerstone.  Mark Nicks played alone on keyboards while his wife joined him on a couple of songs and shared his heart about his many past years at Cornerstone and how much it meant to him as he played a couple of songs, both old and new.

I did a loop around the grounds to catch as much as I can at midnight.  The Gallery Stage featured music sponsored by To Write Love On Her Arms.  Zac Williams played a smoky set of soulful rock and blues.  Stephen Christian, fresh off of what I hear was an epic set by Anberlin (sad I missed it, but there’s only so much you can see), played some new music from his new project, Anchor and Braille.  Following them, Jamie Tworkowski came on stage and shared about TWLOHA.  He made an interesting comparsion about the life of the recently departed Micheal Jackson and how his life was a stark contrast of childlike wonder and deep, darkness from being wounded and wounding others and that many of us are the same.  His organization is doing a lot of good for people suffering from depression and self-mutilation, I would encourage you to check it out.

Meanwhile, The Crucified played a reunion show at Cornerstone for what must be the first time in many, many years.  This was a special moment for long-time veterans of the festival and the band delivered a hot set of punk/thrash music contrast with Mark Solomon’s sense of humor.  Nearly twenty years ago, people would be stage diving of the stage left and right and crowd surfing and moshing all around, but as he laughed, we’re all too old for that.

On the way back, I passed White Collar Sideshow, a drum and bass theatrical act at the Underground Stage.  The frontman and his wife were speaking a powerful message about pornography, fidelity, and living life for God instead of getting trapped in the American Dream.  I couldn’t stay for long, but I reflected on their words compared to the speaking going on at the same time for TWLOHA.  I hope Cornerstone is doing at least a small part to help beat back the hurts of the world in many of the people here and gives them hope and renewed faith in God, because once the festival ends, the reality of life hits back hard.

I’m uploading photos to my Flickr site as the week goes along.  Check them out and there should be more to come once I get home and give some of them a little Photoshop love!